New Ultima Thule Discoveries from New Horizon's Spacecraft



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New Ultima Thule Discoveries from NASA's New Horizons

In this animated gif of Copper Belt object, Ultra Thule made two images taking 38 minutes apart, the "Thule" lab is close to the New Horizons spacecraft. As Ultra Thule is seen to shoot, hints of topography can be noticed. The images are taken by the long-range reconciliations imagery (Lorry) at 4:23 and 5:01 universal times on January 1, 2019 of respective ranges of 38,000 miles (61,000 kilometers) and 17,000 miles (28,000 kilometers) by 1017 feet. (310 meters) and 459 feet (140 meters) per pixel. Credit: NASA / Journals Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory / Southwest Research Institute

Data from NASA's New Horizons Spacecraft, which explores Kuiper Belt object Ultima Thule Earlier this week, is yielding scientific discoveries daily. Among the findings of the mission science team in the last day are:

  • Initial data analysis has found no evidence of rings or satellites greater than one mile in diameter orbiting ultima Thu all.
  • Data analysis also revealed no evidence of an atmosphere.
  • The color of Ultra Thule matches the color of similar worlds in the Copper Belt, as determined by telescopic measurements.
  • The two lobes of ultima Thule – the first copper belt contact binary visited – are almost identical in color. The matches we know about binary systems that do not come into contact with each other, but rather orbit around a shared point of gravity.

"The first exploration of a small copper belt object and the world's most remote exploration of history is now history, but almost all data analysis is in the future," said Alan Star of the Southwest Research Institute in Boulder, Colorado.

New Ultima Thule Discoveries of New Horizons

The New Horizons science team created the first stereo image pair of Ultima Thule. This image can be viewed with stereo glasses to reveal the triple dimensions of the Copper Belt object. The images that created the stereo pair were taken by the Long-Range Reconciliation imagery (Lorry) at 4:23 and 5:01 universal time on January 1, 2019 of respective ranges of 38,000 miles (61,000 kilometers) and 17,000 miles (28,000 kilometers). ), With respective original weight of 1017 feet (310 meters) and 459 feet (140 meters) per pixel. Credit: NASA / Journals Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory / Southwest Research Institute

Data transmission from New Horizons will pause for about a week while the spacecraft passes behind the sun as seen from here on Earth. Data transmission resumes January 10, starting from a 20-month download of the spacecraft's remaining scientific treasures.

"Those of us on the science team can't wait to start digging into that treasure trove," said Ed. New Horizons Completed Flabby In History When it came to about 2,200 miles (3,500 km) from the Ultima Thule at 12:33 AM EST on January 1, its past performance increased by more than 32,000 miles (51,000 miles) per hour.

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