City Fights Renovations – BC News



Vancouver City Council is tension with tenants as they battle renovations.

On Tuesday, CTV News reported board unanimously approved key parts of a movement to protect tenants who were forced out of their homes in favor of a quick profit by landlords.

The movement including measures gives tenants more tools to fight & renovate & nbsp; & nbsp; & nbsp; – The practice of evicting tenants so a host can demolish, renovate or sell a property.

Counselors voted on an amendment of the manner of taxpayers to report back in the first quarter of 2019.

– With files from CTV Vancouver

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Homeowners in the Lower Mainland are welcome to some warming centers as the mercury drops.

This is the second night in a row the centers have been opened as weather aging remains in effect.

QTV news is reporting temperatures are expected to feel like -6 ° C overnight morning fittings in the wind cold.

Vancouver opens its warming centers when temperatures reach or feel like -5 ° C.

Pets, bicycles and carts are allowed in the centers and up to 100 people have the advantages of the centers on a given night last year.

– With files from CTV Vancouver

The holidays are an exciting time for many, but they can also be a difficult time for thousands.

The Interior Crisis Line gets a whole lot busier during the holiday season with incoming calls increasing by 25 per cent last December and over 30 per cent last January, the line of crisis line clinging more and more.

The Interior Crisis Line is now in need of volunteers.

"We are deeply grateful for the amazing staff and volunteers who answer calls 24/7 across the network," said Alisa Christmas, manager of the Interior Crisis Line at Vernon. "They are not only saving lives but changing them every time they pick up their phone."

The training to become a volunteer crisis line worker is engaging, thorough and supportive.

Many people say that taking it not only helps them to support calls on the crisis line but improves the way they communicate in their relationships and how they handle stress in their own lives.

The five crisis line sites in the Interior Health area work together sharing calls and providing support to over 20,000 calls across the area each year. That number continues to grow.

"Since we have joined all five of our crisis lines, our call volume has more than doubled, so every one of the inland Crisis Lines is in need of caring people to train like Crisis Line Workers," said Christmas.

The 40 hours of training is offered several weeks at different times of the year.

Through the training, applicants learn new skills and strengthen existing ones to assess, de-escalate, engage intervention when needed and most importantly, conveying acceptance to those who call in the service.

Get yourself to your local crisis line at 250-542-3114 extension 232, to find more.

Inland Crisis Lines can be reached at 1.888.353.2273 (CARE), 24/7/365.

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December 4, 2018 / 3:25 pm | History:
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Dairy cows can be optimistic or pessimistic of a young age, and their incomparable outlook can predict their ability to cope with stress, a new research from the University of British Columbia says.

Benjamin Lekorps, a PhD student at the Animal Welfare Program, said the study has been making animal health benefits and suggests some communications between the human and animal worlds.

"In humans, we know that personality traits can really affect how people cope with stress, cope with challenges or even their social life and so on." "We really wondered if it was applicable to animals as well," Lekorps said.

The study, including in Scientific Reports, asked how calves who previously had been identified as frightening, sensitive, pessimistic or optimistic reacted under stressful situations.

The stress tests came four months after their personality traits had been tested when the animals were between 25 and 50 days old.

The more pessimistic calves are more vocal and have higher eye temperatures, which are signs of stress, he said. Eye temperature increases when an animal feels threatened because the sympathetic nervous system is activated and increases blood flow to the eyes, Lekorps said.

While optimism was taught as a major predictor of how good human beings are composed of constraints, few studies have focused on pessimism and optimism in other ways, he said.

Lekorps has a personality traits frequently taught as an average across a variety of species, but it is important to look at individuals when they buy animal welfare because some calves will be more sensitive to challenges than others.

Victoria Police are investigating what is a sudden death.

QTV News is reporting that a Victoria Park was cordoned off due to the investigation.

The park is located right at the galloping goose bike road near Bournside Road.

Police cruisers can be seen at Cecelia Ravine Park which is closed since 9:45 am Tuesday morning.

It is unclear if the death is suspicious in nature at this time.

– With files from CTV Vancouver Island

A new study shows, in Canada, the average wait time to get medical treatment necessary is 19.8 weeks.

In British Columbia, the wait time is increased by more than three weeks at an average of 23.2 weeks.

The new study released by the Fracer Institute examines the total wait time patients face over 12 medical specialties – from a family doctor's appointment to a consultant with a specialist, when the patience finally takes treatment.

Throughout the province, wait for this year is the longest for orthopedic surgery (57.2 weeks) and short-term for medical oncology (6.0 weeks).

It is the fifth consecutive year that the Midi Vicky Beaver was more than 20 weeks old.

"Patients in British Columbia are waiting for more than five months for necessary treatment – which should spur action from police officers," said Bachushus Berua, Associate Director of Health Policy Studies at the Fraser Institute and Author of Waiting Your Tour: Waiting for Health Care in Canada, 2018.

While the average wait time is down from a record-high waiting period of 26.6 weeks last year, they are still more than doubled in the 10.4 weeks reported in 1993 – when the Fraser Institute first started tracking national wait times.

"It's time for policemen in Victoria and across Canada to reform the outdated policies that contribute to a long wait time," said Barua.

"Long waits for medical treatment are not a trivial matter – they can increase suffering for patients, decrease the quality of life, and in the worst cases, lead to disability or death."

The Minister of Environment has made a steady increase in fines for unlawful use of off-road vehicles and snowmobiles.

Effective immediately, anyone operating an off-road vehicle in sensitive rabbits, including all BC parks and southern mountain caribou bumps, will face a $ 575 fine. Tickets may be issued under the Wildlife Act or the Park Act by Police, Conservation Officers, Natural Middle Ages or Park Rangers.

The fines were earlier than $ 230 or $ 345, depending on the offense.

The ministry says Caribou counted a species at risk, and protecting their habitat is crucial to the survival of the species.

"Controlled and limited access to sensitive habits by off-road vehicles, such as snowmobiles, is the most effective way to protect the areas and wildlife of harmful entertainment activities," says the ministry.

Snowmobiling in Caribou habitat could result in a fine up to $ 200,000 and six months in jail.

Meanwhile, the driver of a Ford Explorer is facing possible penalties after driving the SUV in a sensitive Kelowna wetland in November.

Conservation Officer Can Owens CasteNet The maximum penalty for destruction of a vetland is $ 1,000,000 or three years in jail.


December 4, 2018 / 11:50 | History:
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Police say a newborn baby girl died in hospital after finding a dumpster last month in the mission.

The RMPP says that the child was found in a dumpster in the Phaser Valley community on November 23.

Police say the baby is rashed to hospital and remained in critical condition until she died last Thursday.

Police say the cause of death is still being installed.

The 21-year-old woman reportedly arrested and released in response to the incident.

No charges are laid.


December 4, 2018 / 11:03 | History:
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Leaders of several North Beach BS First Nations say if the Senate does not approve a bill barring super-sized oil tankers from the region, their weak but thriving marine-based economies will die.

The law will put into law an existing moratorium on tankers that carry more than 12,500 tons of crude oil in the waters between the northern tip of the Vancouver Island and the Alaska border.

The law passed the House of Commons Last Spring and is now debated in the Senate.

Chief Marilyn Slett from the Sechzat Nazis is a delegation of chiefs and elected leaders in Ottawa this week to fan of senators to pass the legislation that cleared the House of Commons last spring.

The bill is strongly opposed by the Alberta government, which believes it cuts off a complete option for shipping crude oil. Prime Minister Rachel Nutley has added to the list of irrationalities between her province and the federal government.

Sloett says the waters are connected to the eligible costs, and a great deal of language was the end of their family.

Second Grade of Murder Charges Are Approved In The Death Of A 87-Year-Old Vancouver Woman Last Month.

Nicholas Dwayne Wallace, 23, from Surrey is charged with the murder of Elizabeth Poulin, who is discovered in blood in her Kingsway apartment.

Vancouver police received a 911 call on November 24, after a relative reveal the body.

Wallace was arrested two days later in Surrey. He remains in Casam.

Palin, who was disabled, lived alone and was Vancouver's 15-year-old pandemonium pumpkin.

Four years after eight-year-old Teagan Bathstone's body was found in the back of a car in South Surrey, her father says he spent years worrying about her safety.

Her mother is now on trial for second-degree homicide in New Westminster.

"Relaxing it is difficult, but to be honest, I relive it every day, right?" Teagan is gone and she will never be back, "Gabe Battone tells CTV news outside court on Monday.

Boston has said that he and Tegan's mother were separating the child, but the communication with the reader was sometimes a source.

"You deal with it because you keep the child's best interests, but we've been worried about how we've been worried for years," he said.

Her father said that he tried unsuccessfully to get a temporary case of the Trial following a suicide attempt by Lisa in 2012.

The crown was criticized by the Teagan, and the murder was partly motivated by the responsibility of the girl's father.

– With files from CTV Vancouver

TransLink's new composite wristbands are sculpted by the search to make a quick buck.

Only hours after the wearable selection of bracelets posted on Monday, they were resold on Craigslist.

TransLink ordered a $ 6 refund deposit for the wristbands, but they were required for sale in up to 10 times that amount, CTV News reports.

Only 2,000 wristbands are released released, and Translink says it will be February before more are available from the manufacturer.

However, approximately 500,000 riders use Daily Metro Vancouver, they become a hot product. It took only three hours for them to sell Monday morning.

The wristbands have an embedded chip that allows the riders to plug and move on the transit system.

– With files from CTV Vancouver

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