Bluefin has a record $ 4.6 million record in New Tokyo market



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A bluefin tuna sold for a recorded US dollar. There. $ 3.1 million ($ 4.6m) This year's first auction in Tokyo's new fish market on Saturday, but behind the celebrations hides a tale of overcrowding and dwindling stocks.

Kyushihi Kimura, which caters to the Sushi Zanmi restaurant chain, paid $ 333.6 million for the 278kg fish during the first auction of the year, and the first to be held in Tokyo's new Toyosu fish market after last year's move. Famous Tsukiji market.

The price at the pre-auction auction was nearly 10 times higher than the price paid at last year's auction – albeit for a significantly smaller fish – and roughly double the previous record, also by Kimurra, in 2013. Intense bidding war with a rival buyer who had won last year.

The Japanese king sushi Kiochi Kimura pays a record price for bluefin tuna on the first and first auction in Tokyo's new Toyosu fish market.

AP

The Japanese king sushi Kiochi Kimura pays a record price for bluefin tuna on the first and first auction in Tokyo's new Toyosu fish market.

The winner said he was "very satisfied with the quality" of the fish but additionally he paid much more than he expected.

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"The tuna looks so delicious and very fresh, but I think I pay a little too much," Kimura told reporters outside the market later, according to news agencies.

Record breaking 278 kg of bluefin tuna. Pacific bluefin tuna reach a maximum length of nearly 3 meters and have been described as twice the size of a lion and faster than a gazelle.

Kiodo News / App

Record breaking 278 kg of bluefin tuna. Pacific bluefin tuna reach a maximum length of nearly 3 meters and have been described as twice the size of a lion and faster than a gazelle.

Kimura said a single piece of the Tuna would be served to customers in its restaurants later that day.

The fish caught off the shores of northern Japan's Aomori prefecture of the small town of Oma, which has a land-wide reputation for capturing the quality of its Tona.

Bluefin tuna is highly valued for its taste in sushi restaurants, but decades of over-fishing have stuck poaching.

The Weekly Red List of Threatened Spaces Classifies the Pacific Bluefin tuna, or Thunnus Orientals, as "sensitive," with a decreasing population.

"The celebration surrounding the annual Pacific bluefin auction hides as deeply into trouble this species really is," said Jamie Gibbon, Global Tula Conservation Manager at the Pew Charge Conscious. "His population has fallen to less than 3.5 per cent of its historical size and overfishing still continues today."

In response to the growing tide of fish, Japan and other government agreed in 2017 to severe quotas and restrictions on fishing, attempting to recover stocks of 20 percent of historic levels by 2034.

That caused considerable disaster and some nutritious in OMA.

Dark Tuma is known as the "black diamond", because fishermen still use traditional methods of fishing, but like traveling, allowing them to catch fish safely.

But, according to the quota, fishermen said they decided to go slow in the summer and concentrate instead on fishing in the fall and winter, when Tuna fetched a higher price. However, when they get out, they find Tuna harder to find as usual and catches low, leading in November to the fact that the Tuna Tuma may eventually disappear from the nation's sushi bars – though December's catch was better .

Hundreds of Japanese fishermen also protested against the new quotas outside the Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food in June, while OMA also canceled its annual Tune Festival in protest in October.

But Gibbons have been accused of having Japan and other countries already committed to higher-ranking quotes for 2019, only one year in the 16-year recovery plan, but also noting reports of Japanese fishermen discarding and not reporting dead bloodfin to avoid their quotas .

"It's time for countries, including Japan, to support Pacific bluefin recovery, fund the necessary science, and to enforce fishing limits, to ensure that there will still be a blueprint for auctioning," he said.

Pacific bluefin tuna reach a maximum length of nearly 3 meters and a maximum weight of 550 kg. A top ocean predator, they have been described as "twice the size of a lion and faster than a gazelle."

They are built as torpedoes, with a hydrodynamic shape, retractable pectoral (side) fins, and, unlike other fish, eyes aligned with their body, according to WWF.

They have two major breeding grounds, off the coast of Japan. Most stay in the Western Pacific all their lives, reaching from Russia's Sahalin Island to the north of New Zealand in the south. But others, when they reach 1-2 years old, make a 11,000 km migration to rich off-road California and Mexico Baja Peninsula, and return after two and four years to explore in the same western Pacific waters that they started living with Pew Chargeable Trusts. .

According to Pew fishermen, Japan, South Korea and Mexico, are often taken by fishermen before they reach maturity, which has severely undermined the population.

According to the Mongabay Nature News website, bluefin is hard to educate in captivity. With highly sensitive light and sound reactions, they rarely smoke in captivity and often swim at top speed and die on impact with the sides of tanks or nets.

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