An ugly truth about your favorite sauce



When it comes to dunking a piece of dried in a soy sauce tray, most of us do not give other thoughts.

But, according to a new study by The George Institute for Global Health, VicHealth and Heart Foundation, some of your favorite Asian sauces, including soy, oysters and fish, contain much more salt than you think.

If we look at 150 different sauces, the study showed that one tablespoon of average soy sauce contained 61 percent of the recommended daily salt intake. If, however, you use only one small soy plastic plastic container for fish, you will feed almost 10 percent of the daily salt intake.

The study was conducted between eight years between 2010 and 2018 and showed that all the analyzed sauces in the Asian style of fish sauce contained the highest salt content.

You may want to have soy sauce.

You may want to have soy sauce.

One spoon of a popular Asian ingredient contains an average of 96% of the recommended daily salt intake.

"We know that bread mixes are very popular because they are fast, fresh and healthy, but we are not too familiar with how much salt is hidden in the sauces we use," said Heart Foundation Dietitian Sian Armstrong.

"The spoon of the state-of-the-art soya sauce contains almost 90 percent of your recommended daily salt intake, while the smallest salt soy sauce has less than half.

"Too much salt can cause high blood pressure, which increases the risk of stroke, heart and kidney disease. One of the best ways to lower your blood pressure is with a small salt, so choose a soy sauce with salt with a salt." Cooking the mixture and baking it on sauce. "

Fish sauce is the most exclusive, with one spoon, containing 96 percent of the recommended daily salt intake.

Fish sauce is the most exclusive, with one spoon, containing 96 percent of the recommended daily salt intake.

On average, one tablespoon of soy sauce contains 61 percent of your recommended maximum daily salt intake.

According to the study, one package of soybean fish contains almost 10 percent of the recommended daily daily salt intake, while the state-of-the-art soya sauce on the shelves of Chang's Light Soja Sauce supermarket, which has more than twice as much salt as the lowest salt soy sauce, Kikkoman naturally the missing salt soya is cut.

The sharpness of the sauce has the lowest spoon salt, although on average it still has 36% of the recommended daily intake.

"Over the last decade, we have not seen a decrease in the amount of salt in these sauces, and there are no goals to make changes," said the author of the report, Clare Farrand, in a statement.

"People suppose that soy sauce can not be less salty, and this report shows that this is not the case with some soybeans, tamarins and oysters that contain much lower salt.

producers who lower the salt content in their sauces – this can be done. "

Some sauces contained 96 percent of the recommended daily salt intake.

Some sauces contained 96 percent of the recommended daily salt intake.

At the beginning of this year, the controversial new study showed that you do not have enough salt in your diet, it may be really bad for you, and you are proposing campaigns that allow people to reduce salt, this could only be worthwhile in countries with very high sodium intake .

The World Health Organization recommends limiting salt intake to 5 g per day – about a teaspoon – because of the risks associated with high blood pressure and stroke.

However, this goal is not known to have been achieved anywhere in the world, please consider the authors of the study published in Lancet medical diary.

"They should be much more concerned about targeting communities and countries with high average sodium intake – over 5 g (corresponding to 12.5 g of salt), such as China – and lowering them to a moderate area" from 7.5 to 12, 5 g of salt, said lead author Andre Mente, a professor at the Institute for Population Research at McMaster University in Canada.

According to the Heart Foundation, Australians consume two teaspoons of salt (10 g) a day on average.

According to the Heart Foundation, Australians consume two teaspoons of salt (10 g) a day on average.

According to the Heart Foundation, Australians consume two teaspoons of salt (10 g) a day on average.

"About six million Australians aged 18 and over have high blood pressure, which accounts for 34 percent of the adult population," said Julie-Anne Mitchell, Director of Prevention, Newie Corp Australia.

Heart Foundation recommends a diet high in vegetable, cellulose, nuts, legumes, healthier oils and various slim proteins, including fish, lean meat, poultry and milk fats.

"By adopting patterns of healthy heart health, which includes a combination of regularly selected foods over time, Australians can reduce salt intake," Mitchell said.


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