New movie show the propeller-like rotation of ultima Thule



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NASA Spacecraft Begins return new pictures

The raw images have been used to create an animation that demonstrates the propeller-like rotation of the ultima thule in the seven hours between 20:00 o'clock (3 o'clock ET) on December 31, 2018 and 5:01 o'clock (12:01 am). January 1, 2019, as seen through the Long Range Reconnections Imagery (Lorry) aboard NASA's new horizons. Credit: NASA / Journals Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory / Southwest Research Institute

New movie show Ultima Thule of an approaching new horizons

NASA / Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory / Southwest Research Institute / National Optical Astronomy Observatory

This movie shows the propeller-like rotation of ultima Thule in the seven hours between 8:00 pm (3:00 pm ET) on December 31, 2018, and 5:01 pm (12: 01) on January 1, 2019, as seen By The Long Range Reconnects Imagine (Lorry) aboard NASA's new horizons as the spacecraft sped to its close encounter with the Copper Belt object at 5:33 am (12:33 on ET) on January 1.

During this deep-space photo shoot – part of the foremost planetary flibi in history – New Horizons & # 39; range to Ultima Thule decreased from 310,000 miles (500,000 km, more than the distance from Earth to Moon) to just 17,100 miles ( 28,000 kilometers, during which the pictures are always larger and more detailed. The team processed two different image sequences; The bottom sequence shows the images in very original relative sizes, while the top corrects for changing distances, so that ultima thule (officially named 2014 mou 69) appears at a constant size but becomes more detailed as the approach progresses.

Last Thule of Approaching New Horizons

NASA / Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory / Southwest Research Institute / National Optical Astronomy Observatory

All these images are sharpened using scientific techniques that enhance detail. The original image scale is 1.5 miles (2.5 kilometers) per pixel in the first frame, and 0.08 miles (0.14 kilometers) per pixel in the last frame. The ultra-Thule's rotation time is about 16 hours, so the movie covers just under half a rotation. Among others, the New Horizons science team will use these images to help determine the three-dimensional shape of Ultima Thule, in order to better understand its nature and origin.

The raw images included in the movie are available on the New Horizons Lorry website. Immediately after January 1, 2008, the new Horizons link the two highest-resolution images into the movie, but the more distant images were sent home January 12-14, a week when New Horizons was too close to the sun (from Earth & # 39) Point of view for reliable communication. New horizons will continue to scan images – including its closest views of ultima Thule – and data for the next several months.

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