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NASA wants to block distances with the craziest Flying Formation ever



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<p class = "canvas-atom canvas- text Mb (1.0em) Mb (0) – sm mt (0.8em) – sm" type = "text" content =Of popular mechanics"Data-reacted =" 22 "> of popular mechanics

Learning deep space is difficult. Not only is everything far away, but when a scholar is trying to learn one specific object in the vast void of the universe, other things can get into the road-like stars, which are critical to all known existence, but have a Brightness that can be distracting.

Therefore, the engineers from NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) are working on what they call a "star", which can block the light of stars outside the solar system for further research.

<p class = "canvas-atom canvas-text Mb (1.0em) Mb (0) – sm Mt (0.8em) – sm" type = "text" content = "It is all after hypothetica that the idea is ambitious, And would not include a single but two spacecraft: the space telescope and the starshade itself, the stars would fly around 25,000 miles (40,000 miles) in front of him, a little more than The distance Going all the way around the earth "data-reacted =" 27 "> It's all too hypothetical, no one has ever flown in space. The Starfeathers fly about 25,000 miles (40,000 km) in front of him, a little more than the distance of walking around the Earth.

<p class = "canvas-atom canvas-text Mb (1.0em) Mb (0) – sm mt (0.8em) – sm" type = "text" content = "" The distances we are talking about are star technology. From hard to imagine, "says JPL engineer Michael Bottom, who is working with fellow JPL engineer Thibault on a starry horse, speaking in Press explanation"The distance we are talking about is the Starheart technology is hard to imagine," Jpl engineer Michael Battle says, working with fellow JPL engineer Thibault on a starhead, speaking at a press release.

"If the starshade were scaled down to the size of a drink coaster, the telescope would be the size of a pencil rubber and they would be separated by about 60 miles. [100 kilometers], "Bottom says." Now imagine these two objects are free-floating in space. Both of them have experienced the bitterness of gravity and other forces, and over this distance we've been trying to keep them both in line with about 2 millimeters.

Photo Credit: NASA / JPL

Once these distances were set, the stardust would go into action, "blooming" like a flower and spreading its artificial petals. Those petals would block out the light of a distant star and leave the space telescope to study nearby planets without distractions.

The idea of ​​a stardom was first proposed in the 1960s Space Race Hallion Days, when they were held for study examinations or outside the solar system. Hundreds of exoplanets have been discovered since then, using natural star blocking techniques. The transit methods, for example, relate when planetary orbits place exoplanets in between the telescope and their stars.

<p class = "canvas-atom canvas-text Mb (1.0em) Mb (0) – sm mt (0.8em) – sm" type = "text" content = "NASA is looking forward with the stashade, trying to match any Potential project with it Wide Field Infrared Survey Telescope (WFIRST)In the mid-2020s, a telescope with a 2.4-meter primary mirror that the agency hopes will start. WFIRST will have its own starlight blocking device embedded inside, known as a corona graph. "Data-Reacted =" 45 "> NASA is looking forward with the star shadows, trying to match any potential project with its wide-ranging Infrared Survey Telescope (WFIRST), a primary-mirror telescope of 2.4-meter diameter that the agency hopes to. Will start in the middle of 2020. First, its own starlight blocking tool will be embedded inside, known as a corona graph.

Although these technologies work separately at the moment, the field is working on algorithms that would allow us to detect when Starshad is out of alignment all the miles away.

The key to a star's success would be the formation of two-25,000 miles away from each other. There is a high target, which is part of the appeal.

"This to me was a fine example of how site technology is becoming ever more extraordinary by building on its previous successes," said much of William, NASA's Starhade Technology Development Activity manager. "We use formation flying in space each time a capsule docks at the International Space Station. But Michael and Thibault have gone far beyond that, and showed a way to maintain formation over weight greater than Earth itself.

<p class = "canvas-atom canvas- text Mb (1.0em) Mb (0) – sm mt (0.8em) – sm" type = "text" content = "Source: JPL"data response =" 49 "> source: jpl

<p class = "canvas-atom canvas- text Mb (1.0em) Mb (0) – sm mt (0.8em) – sm" type = "text" content =(& # 39; You may also like & # 39 ;,)"Data-reacted =" 50 ">(& # 39; You may also like & # 39 ;,)

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